Baja 2008 Day 6

Day 6

We rode from Mulege over the mountains and down the arroyo to San Juanico and then on to Ciudad Constitucion for the night. We had hoped to return to Loreto via the mountains, but our estimate of time was off on this trip and this day was no exception. It’s just too much fun to stop and take pictures and enjoy the scenery. Who knows if you’ll ever be back this way again?

After a few wrong turns getting out of town, we got on the right sand road and were on our way. There are even a few signs out there to help you along. I had loaded a copy of Mexico Altas v2 in our GPS units so we knew where we were and this road is on the map and is pretty accurate, as I remember.

This road has two distinct characters; first the mountain section with lots of dramatic views of the mountains and plenty of sharp steep turns, and then the big Arroyo San Raymundo that takes you all the way west and south to the coast highway.

Both halves were lots of fun in their own way. There were a couple of short and really steep sections in the mountians that had been paved with rocks to keep the road in place. And of course, in the arroyo lots of rocks and sand to practice your skills and be thankful you packed light for this trip.

We finally arrived at the big palapa overlooking the Scorpion Bay in San Juanico. We ordered lunch and downed several bottles of Gatorade to replenish our fluids. Yes, we carried water, but we drank it all.

Just as we pulled up to park, three other bikes pulled up also. Three DRZ-400s no less. I walked over to the brightly colored young riders and suggested they should find some decent bikes to ride! They had just come from San Ignacio via the coast road. They were having a great time.

Sitting at the bar was a guy using his laptop with his dog hanging around. He had sailed there from the LA area and he could be a movie double for Thomas Hayden Church. His boat was anchored out in the bay. Retired Navy guy, just enjoying a spring sail down Baja headed for the Sea of Cortez. I think he had two margueritas for every Gatorade we had. My kind of sailor!

The ‘Pemex’ station in San Juanico is a grizzled old guy with a whole collection of 5 gal jerry cans, a tall platfrom and a siphon hose. He filled our bikes and measured the amount about as fast as you can do it at the Chevron back home. And priced normally, to boot. His place was where they hauled all the dead cars and trucks. What a collection he had.

Ciudad Constitucion is an interesting town. It most unique feature is Highway 1 running down the middle of it. The highway is divided into three sections, the original highway down the center with a row of planted palms down each side. Just outside that is a two lane with parking, one way street that parallels the main route. Sort of the business route. The main highway is about three feet higher than the side streets. Most but not all of the cross streets have traffic lights, so the turning and cross traffic is quite a show.

We watched if for awhile while we ate our tacos for dinner and decided it would not work in the States. BTW, traffic lights and signs in Ciudad Constitucion are apparently just suggestions. It was entertaining!

The DRZ in its natural habitat

The DRZ in its natural habitat

Mark takes a break in the shade as the road gets more interesting

Mark takes a break in the shade as the road gets more interesting

Suddenly the scenery is spectacular

Suddenly the scenery is spectacular

I can't lose this guy!

I can’t lose this guy!

Typical road conditions across the arroyos

Typical road conditions across the arroyos

An oasis with water and birds and ducks. Always the unexpected

An oasis with water and birds and ducks. Always the unexpected

Back on the pavement

Back on the pavement

I packed a tripod all over Baja and I was going to use it

I packed a tripod all over Baja and I was going to use it

Hwy 1 goes right through the middle of town

Hwy 1 goes right through the middle of town

Continue to Day 7

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